Convert SCART to HDMI – Understanding Their Signals

20 Nov

 

There are many reasons why SCART-supported devices needed to be upgraded into HDMI-supported devices. But before you do that, you need to have some insights about the different signals that are being carried and transferred to the two connecting devices. This way, you won’t have any doubts once you’ve changed your systems. It usually costs much money so be sure you have the right resources to pursue your venture.
Composite Signal
This is regarded as the lowest signal being carried through the SCART connector. You usually lose some audio and video quality when you have these analog signals, which make you think that you ought to convert SCART to HDMI. This type of SCART signal is usually found on VHS players so you can just imagine the output quality.
S-Video Signal
This signal has a significantly higher quality than composite signal. It still holds analog signal which is then transferred to the output devices. The only difference is that the audio and video signals have their own connections. Separating the signals dramatically improves the quality, reducing the loss during the transfer.
RGB Signals
In a SCART-driven connection, this has the highest audio and video among the three. It has the same properties of the S-video signal. What makes it special is that it uses 3 separate connectors for the TV display, thus having the acronym – red for R, green for G, and blue for b.
SCART connections play a vital role for most devices on the area of Europe. Several European countries still use the SCART lead, dominating it from another equally famous connection which is the HDMI lead. If you find the need to switch into a higher A/V connection, then go for HDMI. You can do that by purchasing the HDMI-supported device or you can just convert the SCART signal to make it compatible with HDMI output devices, such as HDTVs and HD monitors.

click here for more details  http://scarttohdmi.co.uk/hdmi-to-scart-converter-box/

 

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